Tagged: Book review

Reflections on Clausewitz’s “On War”; Chapter 1

I’ve recently decided to undertake an in-depth study of Carl Von Clausewitz’s book On War; one of Western Civilization’s greatest works of strategy. I find that the best way to aid my study has always been to write down notes as I read; those notes are what follows. Hopefully you find them a useful summary; if you wish to read along with me, I’d appreciate hearing your own thoughts in the comments section.

Sallust by Quintus Curtius: A Review

Sallust: The Conspiracy Of Catiline And The War Of Jugurtha is a work of Roman History, written by one of Julius Caesar’s lieutenants during his retirement (the eponymous Caius Sallustius Cripus) and translated by my colleague Quintus Curtius.  He had several reasons for assembling a new translation. The first is the sheer beauty of the prose: For in every state those who have no resources envy the productive and, due to dissatisfaction with their own lot, are eager for everything to be changed.  They are nourished by upheaval and sedition without care, as poverty is easily maintained without great expense....

American Kiss by Dr Danny de Gracia

“…the classic icon of the 20th century was the American kiss. Look at the scenes from the end of the Second World War. Men and women had fire, moral passion, unbridled love for life and love for one another. It showed in the way they kissed each other.”

Book Review: Understanding #Gamergate by Scott Cameron

Scott Cameron’s Understanding #Gamergate is a 14,000 word dissertation explaining the core issues which started Gamergate, the major developments which have proceeded since that time, introductions to the major players, and a framework by which the reader can measure and weigh the arguments of both sides.

An Analysis of The Feminine Mystique, Chapter 1

Introduction The problem lay buried, unspoken, for many years in the minds of American women. It was a strange stirring, a sense of dissatisfaction, a yearning that women suffered in the middle of the 20th century in the United States. Each suburban wife struggled with it alone. As she made the beds, shopped for groceries, matched slipcover material, ate peanut butter sandwiches with her children, chauffeured Cub Scouts and Brownies, lay beside her husband at night—she was afraid to ask even of herself the silent question—‘Is this all? The ever lovely Sunshine Mary has organized a reading and discussion of...